September Workshop: Start your own Restart Party!

restarts

You have contacted us from all over the UK and well beyond. Some of you have plenty of repair skills you want to share. Others love the concept and would like to see it happening nearby. We have created a list of initial guidelines to help you run your event, but we know sometimes a friendly get-together can do wonders in supporting a new community activity.

So we’re organising a special one-day event in London on Saturday 14 September to help up to 15 people get started running a Restart Party or community repair event in your town. We’ll have a session on logistics, tools, venues, health & safety – and a Restart Party for you to attend and get stuck in.

If you’d like to get involved, please fill this form as soon as possible – we only have limited availability.

Dear makers

A creative fix at Central Saint Martins

A creative fix at Central Saint Martins

We thought we would share some thoughts with you. We’ve spent a year heavily invested in building communities of repairers. During this time we’ve attended a few Makerfaires, admired your work on Instructables, supported your work on Kickstarter. And we look forward to meet many more makers at Makerfaires in Manchester this weekend and in Rome in Europe.

We noticed a couple of articles on fixing and making (most inspired by this piece in Wired), and we thought we might just go ahead and start a conversation between makers and fixers.

Making is a primal instinct – in some ways more primordial than fixing. Who doesn’t remember “making” with sticks and mud as a child, or with empty yogurt containers, used toilet paper rolls, shoe boxes, playdoh, rubber bands. We made cities, robots, space ships, animals. We made art and presents for each other. Utility was rarely our motivation. Joy and wonder seemed to drive childhood making.

Perhaps it’s so obvious it doesn’t need stating, but everybody was a maker until our rigid educational systems drubbed it out of some of us.

These systems taught us utility tied to growth – about being successful, being productive and that accumulating ever more and better stuff was the ultimate reflection of one’s worth. Now some of us did not ever really buy into this – some kept on dreaming, making and creating for the sake of it. And some of us were even able to convince others of the indirect “utility” of this, and were able to make a living off of this. Both of these groups might identify as “makers”.

Yet others found ourselves, perhaps in their late 20s, perhaps even later, scratching our heads wondering where our profound alienation with “stuff” came from.

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